Entries in the 'Unity' Category

“Shavuot: Light In The Midst Of Chaos” (Linkedin)

My new article on Linkedin “Shavuot: Light in the Midst of Chaos

The Jewish holiday of Shavuot, the celebration for the giving of the Torah, has a special meaning this year. While Israeli society is under missile attacks, there is no festive atmosphere. It is a time to make a seminal decision about the people we want to be and how we want to face the future: in division and quarrels or to become guarantors for each other, to look at our actions through the world’s lens or through a deep introspection of our role as a people that received at the foot of Mount Sinai.

The Austrian Chancellor hoisted the Israeli flag on the roof of his office as a sign of solidarity with Israel. The Czech President tweeted a picture of his country’s flag next to the Israeli flag with a heart. Slovenia, Hungary and Poland expressed support for the struggle against Hamas, and Western governments, the UK, France and Germany, strengthened Israel with words of appreciation.

But the enthusiastic demonstrations of support by world leaders will have very limited affect, particularly if it only stems from personal sympathy with Israel. Politicians send hearts and wave Israeli flags in large cities in their countries, yet simultaneously hordes of enthusiastic people wave Palestinian flags and demonstrate against Israel.

If the clashes on the home field are not enough, then the clashes also spread abroad. In Germany synagogues have been vandalized and Jewish communities in Europe are on high alert for possible attacks and clashes.

This is the real way humanity looks at us, not through the diplomatic smiles and handshakes that come from some world leaders. The hateful demonstrations will far outweigh the expressions of support. Hostility will replace the former friendships until we are not tolerated anywhere in the world; no place will be left where a Jew will be able to live in peace.

But there is a way out. It is through our unity. Rabbi Akiva said, “Love your neighbor as yourself is the great rule of the Torah” (Jerusalem Talmud, Nedarim). When Israel received the Torah it received a power that elevated them above their egoism and division—the root cause of all the threats the Jewish nation faces—and made them love each other as themselves. It reminds us that only if we unite will we succeed. Otherwise, the Talmud warns us, “There will it be your burial” (Shabbat 88a, Avoda Zarah)

Mount Sinai, the place where we received the Torah, symbolizes thoughts of siná, hatred toward each other. From the time of ancient Babylon to this day, the ego has not stopped growing and overpowering us, demanding more at the expense of others and tearing us apart as Jews. And there, at the foot of the mountain, we were first required to make a far-reaching decision as a people: either we would be united as one man in one heart or we would endure ongoing suffering and external pressure.

There is no sooner or later in the Torah, these are eternal laws. What we go through in these difficult days is another link in a chain of predicaments we have experienced as Jews throughout generations. The external pressure today requires us to unite and create a protected space between us.

We received the Torah, the method to connect us, the means to cover all crimes with love. This is how we became a people, the Jewish nation or “Israel,” which stems from the Hebrew words “Yashar Kel” (“straight to the Creator”). It refers to a state where we are granted the method to attain the Creator, the quality of love and bestowal, through our freewill.

The connection between us, the Jews, harnesses what the wisdom of Kabbalah explains are the seventy roots of the nations of the world. We are included in them and involved with them after a long exile in which we have absorbed those roots. Therefore, if we connect, we will radiate the power of the connection between us to all of humanity. The roots will all come together and grow into a strong tree that bears fruit for everyone, each and every one. And the stronger we become, the more we will radiate light to the nations of the world, and the more we will gain the world’s support as chaos will transform into peace.

The Strength Of Unity

931.01Question: What is the connection between Passover and receiving the Torah? Why did the people of Israel receive the Torah on the 50th day after leaving Egypt?

Answer: The fact is that from the exit from egoism (from Egypt) to the ascent to the level of the quality of bestowal, which is necessary to enter into the realization of love thy neighbor as thyself, 50 levels must be passed. These are the 50 days.

There are seven degrees from Bina (the property of bestowal) to Malchut (the property of receiving): Hesed, Gevura, Tifferet, Netzach, Hod, Yesod, and Malchut. 7 times 7 equals 49. This means that it is necessary to reach these 49 steps.

On the 50th day, it becomes possible to contact the property of Bina (the property of bestowal). Having achieved this property, a person can already receive an instruction called Torah.

Question: Are all these figures: 40 years old, 600,000 men, etc., steps?

Answer: Yes, these are states that you must go through.

Question: Who are the 600,000 men? What are these steps?

Answer: This means the six parts of Zeir Anpin: Hesed, Gevura, Tifferet, Netzach, Hod, Yesod, each of which consists of ten thousand.

It turns out that 60 times 10,000 equals 600,000. When we raise ourselves spiritually, we rise from the level of Malchut to the level of Zeir Anpin, and from the level of Zeir Anpin to the level of Arich Anpin. This is a power of multiplication by a factor of 10,000 . Therefore, it turns out that the capacity of our association is 600,000. All these figures speak only of a qualitative change within a person.

Question: But did such events take place? Did 600,000 men stand at Mount Sinai?

Answer: There were perhaps millions, but only 600,000 were ready to receive the condition of “love thy neighbor.”

Question: But again, is this the number of people or the quality? Is that sort of the strength of those people who were ready to receive the Torah?

Answer: Yes, by uniting with each other, they created such a force.
[281882]
From KabTV’s “Spiritual States” 6/3/19

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“The Rockets Expose The Myth Of Coexistence” (Linkedin)

My new article on Linkedin “The Rockets Expose the Myth of Coexistence

The good thing about crises is that they expose the truth. After the Israeli War of Independence, Arabs remained in many places in Israel and became Israeli citizens. Over the years, it seemed as though we’ve learned to live together in peaceful coexistence. It was clear that there is no love between the two populations, and that the Israeli Arabs sympathized with the Palestinians in the West Bank, but they still chose to remain in Israel and lead a full civic life here, work alongside Israelis, trade with Israelis, and benefit from the amenities of a prosperous economy. For many years, it seemed as though the hatred that flared during the War of Independence had subsided thanks to the frequent contact with Israeli Jews. It was a myth. The rockets from Gaza and the riots in Jerusalem exposed the truth: Israeli Arabs identify themselves as Palestinians, and they only waited for a time when the Jewish society in Israel was divided and weak enough for them to expose that they, too, want the destruction of the State of Israel and the establishment of a Palestinian state from the Jordan river to the Mediterranean sea. For some reason, we enjoy lying to ourselves. We cannot afford this luxury; we should tell ourselves the truth: Nothing has changed since the establishment of the State of Israel. The Arabs, who supported the Nazis in World War II, are just as keen to destroy us now as they have always been.

“The Israeli nation had been constructed as a sort of gateway by which sparks of purity would flow onto the entire human race throughout the world,” to use the words of kabbalist Baal HaSulam. This purity, this unity above the ego, is the meaning of being “a light unto nations.”

We have to understand what Israel stands for in the world. The nation of Israel was “officiated” when descendants of strangers who were often hateful toward each other chose to unite above their enmity. By doing so, under the leadership of Abraham and his lineage, and finally under Moses, they set a precedent showing how people can overcome their egos and unite. “The Israeli nation had been constructed as a sort of gateway by which sparks of purity would flow onto the entire human race throughout the world,” to use the words of kabbalist Baal HaSulam. This purity, this unity above the ego, is the meaning of being “a light unto nations.”

But since human nature is selfish to the core, or as the Torah puts it, “The inclination of a man’s heart is evil from his youth” (Gen. 8:21), Israel’s method of achieving peace among sworn enemies has put it on a collision course with the rest of humanity. In truth, no division is greater or deeper than the division between Israel and the rest of the world, and no hatred is more intense. The chasm between Israel and the nations is a projection of the chasm between the nature of giving and unity and the nature of receiving and selfishness. There is no compromise; in the end, only one will remain.

When Israel are united, they are powerful enough to deter any enemy. In fact, a united people of Israel has no enemies since the light of unity it emits attracts the nations toward it to learn how they, too, can unite. The book Sifrey Devarim (Item 354) writes that in antiquity, in times when Israel were united, people from the nations of the world would “go up to Jerusalem and see Israel … and say, ‘It is becoming to cling only to this nation.’”

Alas, today we are anything but united. And when we are disunited, we are powerless, and the world feels our weakness and wishes to seize the moment and destroy us. When we are disconnected from our unity, our anchor of strength, the ego takes over the world and wishes to destroy its only enemy: the people of Israel. “Israel will be a holy congregation and one association, as one man with one heart. Then, when unity restores Israel as before, Satan will have no place in which to place error and external forces,” writes the book Shem MiShmuel. “When they are as one man with one heart,” it continues, “they are as a fortified wall against the forces of evil.” However, “If there is division among them,” writes the book Masechet Derech Eretz Zutah, “it is said about them (Hosea 10:2), ‘Their heart is divided; now they will bear their guilt.’”

This is what is happening today. We are suffering the consequences of the baseless hatred among us, and the whip is our neighbors. Our own disunity is the instigator of their violence, and the only fire extinguisher we have is our solidarity, our care for one another. If we can rise above the chasms in the Israeli society, we will prosper more than any other nation. If we do not, we will bear our guilt.

“Peace Begins Within” (Linkedin)

My new article on Linkedin “Peace Begins Within

Hundreds of rockets, fatalities, injuries, homes severely damaged, and entire cities shut down. Palestinians in the West Bank, and Israeli Arabs throughout the country, are beating and stoning Jewish civilians, attacking police officers, attempting to shoot and car-ram soldiers, and to lynch people in their cars. This is what Israel looks like today. We can complain about the biased and antisemitic reports that the press is showing, or that the Biden administration enables such things to happen and even tacitly supports them, but they aren’t the problem; they are the symptom. If at such a critical time, we allow ourselves to engage in infantile bickering and “I told you so” type arguments, then we are the ones encouraging the violence; we are the enablers.

How can we solve our security problems when we put sticks in each other’s wheels? Our own division is our haters’ fuel. If we want to be in a different place tomorrow, we have to start going there today. But when everyone points a blaming finger at others and says “Only I know the way,” then clearly no one knows the way and nothing will improve.

How can we solve our security problems when we put sticks in each other’s wheels? Our own division is our haters’ fuel. If we want to be in a different place tomorrow, we have to start going there today. But when everyone points a blaming finger at others and says “Only I know the way,” then clearly no one knows the way and nothing will improve.

The clash between Jews and Arabs is as old as our efforts to reestablish the Jewish State toward the end of the 19th century. But their level of activity against us depends on us, not on them. When we are united, they are quieter; when we are divided, they rise up with murderous intent.

If we want them to change, they need our positive influence. They need to feel that there is love within us, then they, and the whole world with them, will run to us. But when there is hatred among us, and hatred is what we project, then hatred is what we will get from them.

The book Kol Mevaser writes in this regard: “This is the mutual guarantee on which Moses worked so hard before his death: to unite the children of Israel. All of Israel are each other’s guarantors [responsible for one another], meaning that when all are together, they see only good.” Likewise, the book Binah LeItim asserts, “The foundation of the wickedness of evil Haman … is what he had begun to argue, ‘There is a certain people scattered abroad and dispersed,’ etc. He cast his filth saying that that nation deserves to be destroyed since separation rules among them, they are all full of strife and quarrel, and their hearts are far from one another. However, He put the healing before the blow [took preventing measures] … by hastening Israel to unite and … be one, as one man, and this is what saved them, as in the verse, ‘Go, gather together all the Jews.’”

Accordingly, when we unite, we will see the world changing its attitude toward us for the better. Moreover, we will see that our hopes for peace and for a good future are in our hands, and all we need to do is learn how to activate our secret power: internal unity. Indeed, peace begins within.

“We Made The Bed, And We Will Lie In It” (Linkedin)

My new article on Linkedin “We Made the Bed, and We Will Lie in It

Over the past year, I repeatedly said that if the leadership changes in Jerusalem and Washington, Israel will be in trouble. To some of my social media followers, it sounded as if I was making political commentary or promoted a political agenda, but this is not the case. I gain nothing from this or that individual being the head of the State of Israel, and certainly not from the identity of the president of the US. Rather, my one and only concern is the unity of the people of Israel, as a springboard for instigating the unity of all of humanity.

The implicit, and sometimes overt support of the Biden administration for these acts of violence are the most worrying, since they are the harbinger of far more vicious storms to come. In fact, the Palestinians are the least of our problems. Now that the US administration has opened the floodgates for antisemites around the world, we can expect onslaughts from Iran, Russia, Arab countries, and basically from everywhere. We will lose on all fronts and our situation will go from bad to worse.

The end goal for humanity is to be “as one man with one heart.” It may take us decades of unbearable torment, including a nuclear world war, to get there, or it may take a few short years and a pleasant and swift ride into a society whose members care about each other and are committed to the well-being of humanity and the planet. My concerns, therefore, are spiritual and not political, and certainly not partisan.

Yet, since it is impossible to establish unity without security, before we establish unity, we must secure the persistence of the State of Israel and the security of its people. As I see it, Benjamin Netanyahu has done a far better job at keeping Israel safe than any other prime minister. Across the Atlantic, Donald Trump has done more for Israel’s security than any other American president. Because security is the most essential requirement for establishing unity, I supported both of them.

Accordingly, even before Joe Biden took office, I warned that should he win the election, Israel’s security would be jeopardized. Sadly, as soon as he entered the White House, my prediction began to transpire. The return to the Iran deal, the growing support of the Palestinians, the tacit permission his administration has given to various organizations to attack Israel, such as the International Criminal Court, the UN Human Rights Council, the UN Security Council, and countless others, all seeking to sanction, censor, weaken, and ultimately demolish the Jewish State, are only the beginning.

The riots we are seeing in Jerusalem, Haifa, and Jaffa, as well as the rockets from Jaffa on civilian population seem to stem from various reasons: The Sheikh Jarrah evictions, tensions surrounding the Temple Mount, the threats of Hamas to escalate the violence, and incitement for violence on social media, are a few of them. However, the implicit, and sometimes overt support of the Biden administration for these acts of violence are the most worrying, since they are the harbinger of far more vicious storms to come. In fact, the Palestinians are the least of our problems. Now that the US administration has opened the floodgates for antisemites around the world, we can expect onslaughts from Iran, Russia, Arab countries, and basically from everywhere. We will lose on all fronts and our situation will go from bad to worse.

However, and this is the most important point—I don’t see the Biden administration as the guilty party in this downward spiral. Rather, I think we brought this on ourselves. American Jewry, as well as much of the public here in Israel, wanted Biden to win. They wanted to unseat Trump and place Biden and his progressive administration in the White House. Well, we made the bed, and now we’ll lie in it.

As Jews, we do not understand the power we possess. I am not even talking about political clout and maneuvers that prominent Jews took in order to bring Biden to the White House; I am speaking only on the deeper level. With our desire, we seated Biden and unseated Trump, and all the Jews will pay, including the American Jewry.

The division among Jews is the malady of our people. It has brought upon us every evildoer since the onset of our nation. The division among us also prevents us from winning the world’s favor, since all that they expect from us is unity, and all we ever show them is division. That division causes us to want to see Israel haters in the White House, and makes us cloak our hatred for each other with sanctimonious outcries about justice. But where there is no love, there cannot be justice.

Let me reiterate: I do not speak from any political perspective, but from my spiritual perception of the world. If we want to see a peaceful world, where people are united, we must establish security and unity, in that order. And since the unity of the world begins with unity within the Israeli nation, there must be security in Israel so that Israel may establish unity.

In that regard, I’d like to quote the great Rav Kook, who, during World War I, outlined the connection between the world’s troubles and Israel’s unity. In his book Orot (Lights), he wrote, “The construction of the world, which is currently crumpled by the dreadful storms of a blood-filled sword, requires the construction of the Israeli nation. The construction of the nation and the revealing of its spirit are one and the same, and it is one with the construction of the world, which is crumbling in anticipation for a force full of unity and sublimity, and all of this is in the soul of the assembly of Israel.”

Fjords Of The Soul

933Pursuing the Shechina means pursuing the state our common soul was in before the shattering of Adam HaRishon. We were all united as one soul, filled with the upper light, the presence of the Creator.

But we could not hold on to our connection because a personal desire appeared in each of us, the connection disintegrated, and the light, the presence of the Creator departed from us. This means that the Shechina departed.

We are left with only a tiny glow, with a faint spark of life, the minimum measure of upper light given to us to sustain life so that we can return to the perfect state we were in. But you can return there only through your own efforts, thanks to your own request, prayer, and efforts to unite.

Any steps toward connection, even physical ones, are important because they bring us closer to inner connection. As a result, we will return to the previous state and the presence of the Creator, called Shechina, will fill us. All the gaps and cracks between us will be filled with the presence of the Creator.

Therefore, every time we feel distant from each other, we must imagine how the Creator can fill these gaps. We do not need to come together in such a way as to eliminate all the cracks between us, but we need the Creator to fill all these empty gaps like water fills the gorge between the mountains and forms fjords.

So, to the extent of our annulment, the rejection of egoism, the upper light will fill the whole space between our peaks and connect us together. Then we will feel that we are truly one. But we are not connected to each other directly, only through the Creator who is between us. We strive to reach this state as one man with one heart.

We do not need to go back to the old state, to the same one heart. This must be the heart in which the Creator fills all the voids, the whole space between us.

We will feel this separation more and more. More and more differences and disagreements of all kinds will be revealed between us. We do not cancel them, but want to fill them with the Shechina, the Creator. Therefore, all our work consists of pursuing the Shechina, the presence of the Creator who binds us.

We are not able to unite as one man with one heart, but the Creator can enter between us and unite us. Without the presence of the Creator and the connection between us, we feel ourselves in exile. We come out of exile if the Creator is revealed between us and we connect with each other through Him.

The Creator is revealed only as a connection between us; it is impossible to connect unless the Creator fills all the gaps between us and connects us. If we are so different and distant from each other, then only the upper force can connect us, equalize us, and establish the contact between us.
[281974]
From the Daily Kabbalah Lesson 5/4/21, “Chasing the Shechina

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“War And Peace In Jerusalem” (Linkedin)

My new article on Linkedin “War and Peace in Jerusalem

My grandfather, back in Belarus, was a very religious man. When I was a child, he would often tell me about Jerusalem. Even though I was only five or six years old then, I vividly remember the emotion in his words. He longed to feel Jerusalem, to unite with it. Simply speaking about it made his eyes shine.

The reason that Israel now governs Jerusalem is that the people of Israel have the onus of being “a light unto nations,” of bringing unity and peace to the world. The fundamental rule of the Torah is “Love your neighbor as yourself.” Israel must practice it and set an example to the rest of the world. Only when Israel does this will the rest of the world follow.

My grandfather was born in exile and died in exile. But when I came to Israel and went up to Jerusalem, I remembered his stories, and as soon as we started the climb into the mountains of Jerusalem, I felt his spirit with me; I was realizing my grandfather’s dream. It moved me deeply.

Regrettably, Jerusalem today is very far from the Jerusalem in my grandfather’s dreams. The Hebrew word for Jerusalem, “Yerushalaim“, is a combination of two words: “Ir” [city] “Shlema” [whole/complete], meaning “a city of wholeness” or “a city of completeness.” Also, the word “Shalom” [peace] comes from the world “Shlemut” [wholeness] or “Hashlama” [complementation]. This is why Jerusalem is also regarded as Ir Shalom [a city of peace].

Evidently, there is no wholeness in Jerusalem, no complementation, and certainly no peace. There is plenty of the opposite: division, conflict, and hate. King David, who wrote in Psalm 122 that Jerusalem was built as a city that was joined together, would not be happy if he saw that Jerusalem has become a symbol of conflict, a hub of religious fanaticism and bloodshed.

Despite the intolerance, the city will become what it was meant to be—a center of peace and wholeness, a center of healing for a tormented world. The Book of Zohar writes about Jerusalem (Pinhas, 152): “Jerusalem among the rest of the countries [is] like the heart among the organs. Hence, it is in the middle of the whole world, like the heart, which is in the middle of the organs.”

Jerusalem, being the central place for Judaism and Christianity, and an important center for Islam, reflects the relationships among the faiths. Since there is no peace among them, the center, where the three religions meet, becomes the focal point of the frictions among them, and therefore the center of hostilities. Over the centuries, the city has been governed by all three vying religions, but the governance has always been achieved by war. Jerusalem will become a city of wholeness and peace, but the question is how long it will take us to make of it what it is meant to be, and how much we will suffer in the process.

The reason that Israel now governs Jerusalem is that the people of Israel have the onus of being “a light unto nations,” of bringing unity and peace to the world. The fundamental rule of the Torah is “Love your neighbor as yourself.” Israel must practice it and set an example to the rest of the world. Only when Israel does this will the rest of the world follow.

For a short while in antiquity, Israel did just that. During the 3rd century BC, there was relative calm in the nation. Three times a year Jews would march up to Jerusalem to celebrate the festivals of pilgrimage: Sukkot, Passover, and Shavuot (Feast of Weeks). The pilgrimages were intended primarily for uniting the hearts of the people. In his book The Antiquities of the Jews, Flavius Josephus writes that the pilgrims would make “acquaintance … maintained by conversing together and by seeing and talking with one another, and so renewing the recollections of this union.”

Once they entered Jerusalem, the pilgrims were greeted with open arms. The townsfolk let them into their homes and treated them as family. The Mishnah (Bikurim 3) lauds this rare camaraderie: “All the craftsmen in Jerusalem would stand before them and ask about their well-being: ‘Our brothers, men of so and so place, have you come in peace?’ and the flute would play before them until they arrived at Temple Mount.” The book Avot de Rabbi Natan writes that every material need of every person who came to Jerusalem was met in full. “One did not say to one’s friend, ‘I could not find an oven on which to roast offerings in Jerusalem’ … or ‘I could not find a bed to sleep in, in Jerusalem.’”

While they lasted, those festivals of bonding had made Israel “a light unto nations.” The book Sifrey Devarim (Item 354) details how people from other nations would “go up to Jerusalem and see Israel … and say, ‘It is becoming to cling only to this nation.’”

Moreover, when Ptolemy II Philadelphus, King of Egypt, heard of the unity of the Jews, he wanted to learn their wisdom. Ptolemy invited seventy sages from Jerusalem to his palace in Alexandria to translate their books into Greek. But before he sent them off to create what is now known as the Septuagint, the first translation of the Old Testament into Greek, Ptolemy asked them about their wisdom, and mainly how he could benefit from it as a ruler. In The Antiquities of the Jews (Book XII), Josephus writes that Ptolemy had sat with the Hebrew sages for twelve straight days asking them “rather political questions, tending to the good … government of mankind.” Ptolemy was “delighted with hearing the laws read to him, and was astonished at the deep meaning and wisdom of the legislator,” writes Josephus.

Finally, “When they had explained all the problems that had been proposed by the king about every point, he was well-pleased with their answers,” concludes Josephus. Moreover, the historian writes that Ptolemy testified that “he had gained very great advantages by their coming, for he had received this profit from them, that he had learned how he ought to rule his subjects.”

Regrettably, Israel’s unity did not last. Internal division and conflicts destroyed the land, and the people were exiled because of their hatred for each other. Now that we are back in Israel, the burden of proof is once again on our shoulders to show that we are worthy of being “a light unto nations,” the center of unity whose heart is Jerusalem.
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“Different People, Different Worlds” (Linkedin)

My new article on Linkedin “Different People, Different Worlds

One sees white where another sees black. One thinks that something is good, and another is certain that it’s bad. Different people, different worlds. How can we collaborate when we are worlds apart, closed inside our shells, and with completely different viewpoints? And, why are we built like this to begin with?

Why is our view so important to us? Our view represents who we are; it is the expression of our self, our ego. If someone disagrees with me, it undermines the foundation of my being, makes me feel unworthy and insignificant, and therefore insecure.

Each person is born with a unique set of traits and qualities. Each person grows in a certain family, under certain conditions, receives a certain upbringing, and lives through different experiences. Each person is influenced through media outlets and social media networks, and all those factors make us who we are.

Because of all those factors, we see the world through different filters, unique glasses that each one wears. This is why it is so difficult, or actually impossible, for us to understand other people. As a result, we find ourselves in constant conflicts. As we try to prove that our view is correct, we forget that each of us is unique, and we end up engulfed in endless ego-wars that lead nowhere but to frustration, despair, and depression.

Why is our view so important to us? Our view represents who we are; it is the expression of our self, our ego. If someone disagrees with me, it undermines the foundation of my being, makes me feel unworthy and insignificant, and therefore insecure.

As long as we are taught that we must compete with each other, we will keep harming one another and regard each other’s uniqueness as a threat. In order to turn our individuality into a socially constructive factor, we must add another layer to our education.

That layer has to do with nature’s complementing contrasts. We have to remind ourselves that all of life consists of contrasts that complement one another and enable each other’s existence. Just as there would be no birth or growth without death and decay, there would be no growth in opinions and ideas without conflicting views. In nature, opposites do not destroy one another; they complement one another, embolden one another, and guarantee each other’s existence. This is nature’s integral formula, and unless we understand its importance and apply it to society, we will destroy each other instead of strengthening each other.

Walking a long journey to reach one’s goal does not happen by hopping on one leg. It happens when we use both legs, left and right, to get to our destination. Human society should be likewise. Our destination is unity, and the only way to get there is by fostering a bond between us. That said, we will have no impetus to bond unless we feel that we are separated and hateful of each other, and must bolster our unity in order to rise above our hatred.

Therefore, when we come across a person whose views we despise, we must keep in mind that that view is there not for us to patronize, but as a basis for building a stronger connection. This remoteness that I feel is my impetus for building closeness, and there will never be another impetus besides the opposite of what we need to build.

People who feel no conflicts with others have no reason to unite; they are content as they are, uninterested and largely indifferent. Only people who are different, who are worlds apart, can ever build true unity, a strong connection, and, ultimately, true love.
[281967]

The Mystery Of The Unification Of The Masculine And Feminine, Part 1

595.01The Mystery of Nature

From the only source, which is the Creator, two forces descend. One of them is the power that relates to Him: the property of bestowal, love, emanation.

The other is an artificial force created by the Creator that did not exist before the beginning of creation —the property of receiving, absorbing, which then became an egoistic property.

Both forces exist in the entire nature of the upper worlds and in our world as a plus and a minus. They are created opposite to each other so that we, who represent the property of receiving, the negative egoistic force, can use our properties to determine the opposite positive force, the Creator, and create certain interactions with it, unification, as in an atom.

One force does not exist separately from another. We always measure, see, feel, and find them in some sort of positioning relative to each other.

Therefore, the negative force in which the Creator created us is necessary precisely in order for us to find, define, and feel Him as a positive, emanating force, and thus be able to begin contact with Him, to detect, define, feel, approach or move away from Him.

In other words, to see what state we are in with respect to the Creator to determine the possibility of absorbing His properties into ourselves.

How can we make ourselves negative to Him as if we are both negative and positive? This is a very difficult question, and even more so its solution.

This is not just the disclosure of the mystery of the unity of minus and plus, the Creator and creation, but the disclosure of how creation develops, reaches its completely opposite state to the Creator, and begins to feel this state as absolutely harmful, unsuitable, and intolerable, and then does everything in order to ascend above it and start to create something positive from your negative self.

How is this possible? After all, creation cannot change its nature in any way. It turns out that it can only change the application of its nature. That is, although I am created completely negative, I can transform even my negative properties, motivations, and actions so that their final result is positive. And how to do it is really a mystery.

We cannot imagine it, that is why we say that this is a secret. We are absolutely not yet in it, but we are in our egoistic negative properties.
[247101]
From KabTV’s “Fundamentals of Kabbalah” 3/3/19

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Harmonious Complement

“No Calamity Comes To The World But For Israel” (Linkedin)

My new article on Linkedin “No Calamity Comes to the World but for Israel

“No calamity comes to the world but for Israel.” These poignant words of our sages (Yevamot, 63a) capture the reason for all the tragedies that afflict us. Not only the Talmud warns about the reason for Israel’s blows. The Book of Zohar also states that when the people of Israel veer off from the right way, “with these actions they bring about the existence of poverty, ruin, and robbery, looting, killing, and destructions in the world” (Tikkuney Zohar, No. 30).

Our nation was formed through a vow to unite “as one man with one heart,” and unity has always been our strength. “The prime defense against calamity is love and unity. When there are love, unity, and friendship between each other in Israel, no calamity can come over them” writes the book Maor VaShemesh.

In the days following the Meron disaster, where 45 people, many of whom children, died in a stampede, the people of Israel proved once more that in crisis, the nation unites. For a short while, we’ve put aside the vociferous, spite-filled arguments, and united in mourning over the pointless loss of life. But tomorrow, when the headlines change and the heart-wrenching pictures give way to new fiascos, the malice will return more intense and venomous than ever. While the circumstances that allowed for this disaster to happen must be examined, we must also not miss out on the opportunity that this tragedy has given us to reconstruct our social relations in this country because this, in the end, is our real source of strength.

In his essay “The Nation,” Baal HaSulam laments our lack of internal unity and ephemeral coalitions. “We are like a pile of nuts,” he writes, “united into a single body from the outside by a sack that envelops and unites them. Their measure of unity does not make them a united body, and each movement applied to the sack produces in them tumult and separation. Thus, they consistently arrive at new unions and partial aggregations. The fault is that they lack the inner unity, and their whole force of unity comes through outside incidents. To us,” concludes Baal HaSulam, “this is very painful to the heart.”

Our nation was formed through a vow to unite “as one man with one heart,” and unity has always been our strength. “The prime defense against calamity is love and unity. When there are love, unity, and friendship between each other in Israel, no calamity can come over them” writes the book Maor VaShemesh.

Moreover, when Israel unite, they are “a light unto nations,” setting an example of love and unity to the world. The Book of Zohar writes that when the people of Israel unite above their hatred, they bring peace to the world. In the portion Aharei Mot, The Zohar writes, “‘Behold, how good and how pleasant it is for brothers to also sit together.’ These are the friends as they sit together and are not separated from each other. At first, they seem like people at war, wishing to kill one another … then they return to being in brotherly love. …And you, the friends who are here, as you were in fondness and love before, henceforth you will also not part from one another … and by your merit, there will be peace in the world.”

The onus of unity does not lie on one faction, but on all parts of the Israeli society. It is time we began a national reflection on our conduct as a nation. We can blame each other all we want for the disasters that land on us, but they will not stop until we realize that they reflect not our incompetence, but our division. Naturally, incompetence and recklessness are accomplices in every disaster, but these vices, too, are the results of our callousness and indifference toward each other. If we are content with finger pointing, we’d better get ready for the next blow.

Some of us openly admit their feeling that “we are not one nation.” However, if we use it to justify our alienation from each other, we will suffer more blows until we realize that we are meant to rise above our hatred, not embrace it and brag about our candor. Only when we rise above divisions are we regarded as a nation, and only then does the world welcome us. The book Sifrey Devarim details how in antiquity, people from other nations would come to Jerusalem during the pilgrimages to witness the brotherhood among Jews. They would “go up to Jerusalem and see Israel … and say, ‘It is becoming to cling only to this nation.’”

Indeed, as we embrace the grieving families, we should also embrace the message of unity. As our sages wrote, this is “our prime defense against calamity,” and the only way we can realize the vocation of our nation in this world.
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